Tag Archives: Carmen Magro

“If music be the food of love, play on.”

Nicely played, William; nicely played, and while many individuals have an adverse reaction to Shakespeare— joining the ranks of countless high school graduates, all of whom lost the taste for prose somewhere between the umpteenth reading of “Romeo and Juliet” and the mandatory participation in the in-class performance of “Julius Caesar“— the ol’ playwright may just be on to something.

Music, that rare substance that possesses the power to echo the tales of past protests, bears the marks of the movements of generations and whispers the collective history of humanity.  A form of sustenance, music fuels individual appetites and brings friends and strangers to the table.

While musical starvation in our world of interconnectivity and online piracy is virtually impossible, I feel as though I’d be committing nothing short of forcible famine to abandon M.O.S.H. This project, which rose from the ashes of a class requirement, has grown into more than a method of grading and evaluation. It’s a form of sustenance. The time has come and, if I may borrow the immortal prose of Shakespeare, I intend to “play on.”

Write On: The Greatest Hits

In our modern world, the three-meals-a-day model took a stagedive. So, while waiting for that next big musical feast, nibbling is fully advisable and certainly recommended. Below, to save you the trouble of raiding the fridge of pop-punk, alternative rock and indie acoustics, you’ll find a collection of bite-worthy reads that should hold even the most insatiable appetite for a spell.

Enjoy.

Photo courtesy of Brandon Debes

A1 Carmen Magro discusses his musical influences, what brought him to music and what his songs mean to him and his fans

B3 Review: “Who Shot Rock and Roll” brings the genre to life

C5 I Call Fives receive praise for their latest endeavor, “Someone That’s Not You”

D4 Every Minute Can Kill discuss the band’s formation, “Faceless Creatures” and offer tips on being a success in the local music scene

E2 Bon Jovi, Springsteen, Alesana and Ace Built this City on Rock and Roll

Bonus: the possibility of a vending machine eating your last dollar bill is slim to none. No need to fear dropping all of your change and looking like a fool, falling to your knees in a desperate scramble to stop the coins from rolling between the Coke machine and your intended treasure trove of over-priced goodies. The tears when you realize that your last quarter just found its way into Narnia via the blackest of abysses; save them for the last all-nighter of the semester.*

*For the sake of artistic direction, let’s just assume that the above example is completely fictitious in nature.


Carmen Magro discusses his musical influences, what brought him to music and what his songs mean to him and his fans

music (noun) – a : the science or art of ordering tones or sounds in succession, in combination, and in temporal relationships to produce a composition having unity and continuity
b : vocal, instrumental, or mechanical sounds having rhythm, melody, or harmony

substance (noun) – a : essential nature
b : a fundamental or characteristic part or quality

heart (noun) – a : the central or innermost part
b : the essential or most vital part of something

Simple definitions defined by Merriam Webster’s online dictionary, simple concepts; yet at times, it feels as though the industry has lost sight of the cornerstone of music— to connect with people on a different level; a level other means of entertainment cannot quite reach.

We’ll sell out before you even know who we are,” a lyric belted out by Davey Fortner of Freshman 15 that, while satirical in nature, reveals an ugly truth: just how far are musicians willing to go to achieve their dreams? While a concrete answer cannot be found in books or online blogs, one thing is certain, Carmen Magro, a Philadelphia-based singer-songwriter and the frontman of an adult contemporary outfit bearing the same name, will never sacrifice his music for fame.

Carmen Magro, Philadelphia resident and singer-songwriter of Carmen Magro. Photo courtesy of Carmen Magro's press kit available at http://www.carmenmagro.com/home.html

The definition of music of substance and heart, Carmen Magro, the man not the band, got his start in the trade by using anything and everything available to him— including the family’s kitchen pots and pans—  to assemble notes and rhythms. After receiving his first drum kit for his 14th birthday, Magro’s eyes opened to the realm of performing on stage.

As is true with many creative professions, articles of substance cannot be forged without trials and tribulations. Unfortunately, Magro lost his father when he was 10, and his mother when he was 19 due to breast cancer. “Those experiences humbled me to really come in tune with my feelings and learn to put them into music,” said Magro. “I find I can’t sing unless it is truly from my heart so I put my heart into every melody and song I write.”

Carmen Magro, the band, consists of Carmen Magro (Vocals, Piano, Keys, Guitar), Chuck Scarpello (Bass), Mark Burkert (Guitar), Dave Murphy (Drums), Steve Sauer (Keys/Synth/Supporting Vocals and Brian Fitzgerald (Violin/vocals). The band recently performed prior to and during halftime of a Philadelphia 76’s game.

Personally, what brought you to music?

Music is, without a doubt, an extension of my soul. I feel I have so much to share with the world and to reiterate what I learn from the world. I do it most easily with music. Putting rhythm, melody and lyrics together to put someone in a moment that makes a difference in their lives is a miracle that music does for all of us. I find myself writing melodies and marrying lyrics with them every minute of every day— some sad, some happy, some playful, some exotic, some tempting; all sincere and all original.

Personally, it is how I put my thoughts of the world into words to share with others. Some people write poems, some bitch and moan about everything, some people are just indifferent. I don’t know how to do any of that. I guess my music is poetic to some extent but it isn’t hard for me to write lyrics. They just come easily with the music. Sometimes I write a melody first but usually the lyrics and music come together instantly in my head and heart as soon as I have the feeling for them. Music is my sanctuary, my release from the world and my connection to it. Sometimes I feel that if I lost the ability to play my music and share it with the world, I would simply wither away and die. It is my lifeline for sure.

What about the Philly/Tri-State area music scene do you enjoy? Given that it’s a far cry from the likes of a big city, do you think it’s easier or harder to gain a following and make a name for yourself? 

As an original artist I have to believe that if you have something special, it will get recognized. But I grew up in Philly. It’s a great town and those that want to come out to hear music know where to go to hear it. I just try to put myself in a position to be heard any way possible. I’m always hoping that every show is a step in the right direction. But like other musicians, even those in big cities as you mention…all have the big and small shows and they have to find a way to give the same show for one as they would for 100 or 1,000 or 10,000. I find that part easy. I just get lost in my music and hope that someone out there enjoys it and may share it with someone else and they may share it as well. Eventually, I hope it gets to someone that feels my music can really shape the world and can open a door professionally for me. But even without that, I’ve never been disappointed playing in a Philly area venue. Whether it’s in Jersey, Delaware or Philly, I find it easy to get lost on stage, put the world aside and just let my music shine through. I wouldn’t treat a stage in LA, NYC, Nashville or anywhere in the world any differently.

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